Content with a purpose

Scott Kronick of PR Week made an important and wonderful point when he wrote that,

“…content with a purpose is about creating a portfolio of content across platforms and media that drives a business and reputational goal. If it doesn’t drive those hard goals, it’s just vanity publishing.”

Although he wrote this back in 2014, I believe that this remains true today. Nothing aggravates an audience more than hearing things that are just said to be said. A brand, a company, or an individual with a PR team should focus not so much on attention, but purpose.

I would be lying if I said it was always a bad thing to receive attention; in some cases, a business make receive attention that makes you more money than you could have ever imagined, but that doesn’t come with talent, but rather luck.

In my opinion, the best way to drive home an important point and make your message known is by having content with a purpose that is driven by a hard or set goal, similar to what Kronick said in his piece. I believe that creating a message, visual or text, must focus more on creating a positive outlook to bolster your reputation rather than hoping for random attention.

Leaving politics out of it, a modern example of poor public relations efforts would be with current US President Donald Trump. Again not picking sides, most people are aware of Trump’s constant use of Twitter, and what sort of backlash he receives for the things he posts. As the President of the United States, Trump is more than welcome to utilize Twitter and post as he pleases, however it would be a smart move by his PR team to review pending tweets of his, and decide from there whether or not it would be beneficial to him to say what he had planned.

Keeping these ideas in mind, it is important to also make note of when a PR team does a good job.

When Snickers ran their live advertisement during the Super Bowl this past February, they received a lot of negative feedback on it, but also a lot of attention. Although it is likely that the disgust with the advertisement did not turn away any consumers of Snickers, it did give reason for Snickers to make some sort of apology or acknowledgement of their failed ad.

Playing on the initial ad, Snickers had Adam Driver, the lead role of the first ad, stand in front of the camera and deliver an apology for the events that had occurred earlier. To further acknowledge their failures, they made light of the situation by having a worker in the back of the screen putting out the fires created before, which in turn constantly cut off Driver’s apology. These interruptions eventually irritated Driver to the point that he had to leave the screen and end the commercial.

Although it was clear that this second advertisement was more scripted than the original ad, it was still pleasing to see Snickers acknowledge what had gone wrong in their live ad.

A public relations team’s most important goal should be to create a more positive perception of whoever they are supporting, and focus on creating a purpose for reaching out to the public, just as Snickers did in their apology advertisement.

Matt Henkel | GVSU | 23 March 2017

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